The major Samsung Galaxy Note 5 design flaw you should know about

In Phones by Ramon LopezLeave a Comment

Those fortunate enough to afford the Samsung Galaxy Note 5 should probably consider keeping it away from the hands of curious peers and children. For the rest of their Note 5’s existence, if possible, or until Samsung issues a massive product recall, which is highly unlikely at this point.

The Note 5 has a fatal design flaw that could either result in the S Pen being lodged in the holster or the holster itself losing its stylus-detection function.

Why? Because, according to reports, the Galaxy Note 5 has a fatal design flaw that could either result in the S Pen being hopelessly lodged in the holster, or, if you manage to dislodge it by force, the holster itself losing its stylus-detection function. Either way, you’re stuck with a broken phone — and a very expensive one at that.

Well, that is, if you accidentally insert the S Pen in the opposite direction, bottom first, which, as any previous Note owner will tell you, isn’t the easiest thing to do. Except, with the Galaxy Note 5, Samsung has made it stupidly easy to insert the S Pen backwards. So easy, in fact, that the holster reportedly offers no resistance whatsoever to impede your efforts, unlike with previous Galaxy Note designs.

Samsung has made it stupidly easy to insert the S Pen backwards. So easy, in fact, that the holster offers no resistance to impede your efforts.

Of course, with the benefit of knowing what it could lead to, nobody would intentionally plug the Note 5’s S Pen the wrong way, but what about those who are not familiar with the consequences, say, kids and the technology-averse? My advice: Pop out the S Pen before letting anybody else play around with the device. It could save you a trip to the service center.

[youtube link=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hehbSG3h3wU” width=”560″ height=”315″]

Video proof culled from Android Police’s YouTube channel


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Ramon Lopez

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Reviews editor: Ramon "Monch" Lopez has 15 years of professional experience creating and editing content for print and digital publications such as Yahoo. He headed the gadgets-merchandising division of one of the Philippines’ largest retail operators somewhere in between. His latest addiction is the comments section of viral Facebook posts.